• Fair Chance Learning

The Impact of EdTech on Students with Disabilities

Throughout my teaching career, I have always been inquisitive in regard to the latest and greatest educational technology for children. Over the last two years, I have worked in special needs and self-contained classrooms and been exposed to many types of edtech that I didn’t even know existed.


Some of these children are non-verbal and need a lot of support within their learning and day to day lives. Others struggle more with speaking fluently and need a lot of visuals to guide them through their day and what is expected of them.


In the classrooms I worked in, the students had smart boards and tablets. And on the smart board, were educational activities and games, which helped those who had a hard time with typing, writing and even reading. On the tablets were a bunch of assistive communication apps that focused on helping students communicate. These apps had an abundant amount of visuals and audio to go along with the pictures being displayed.

These apps would allow students to click to the picture that represented what they wanted to say, and converted the pictures into words that were read aloud to you. It was truly mesmerizing seeing the students who were non-verbal, click on each picture which then formed a sentence and was read aloud through the app. Truly amazing.

Proloquo2Go is one of my favourite assistive communication apps!!



Other apps used on the tablet consisted of voice to text. For the students who could speak fine, but struggled with gross motor skills, this helped them to be able to say what they wanted to have typed out. It converted their vocal words into text. Amazing!

Throughout my teaching career, I have always been inquisitive in regard to the latest and greatest educational technology for children. Over the last two years, I have worked in special needs and self-contained classrooms and been exposed to many types of edtech that I didn’t even know existed.

Tapit’s are just like a smart board, but a lot more flexible and accessible. It can scrunch down, or it can stand tall. You can also lay it completely flat. This comes in handy for students who may be in wheelchairs. The Tapit allows students to write, draw, access any apps or websites for educational games, songs, etc.

I remember thinking back 2 years ago when I was first exposed to these edtech, and thinking- this is truly AMAZING. It allows all children no matter what they might struggle with, be able to communicate and learn in a way that works best for them. Everyone is able to participate in their learning without any exclusions. It truly amazed me to work with these pieces of technology with the children. Seeing their growth and progress over the years. Technology truly is life changing and I am so grateful that more technology is coming out that is accessible, accommodating and supportive for children, especially children with special needs. I am beyond grateful to have been exposed to these pieces of technology, apps and programs so I can apply them within my teaching to support my students. It makes a significant impact in their lives and I can’t wait for what the future holds.


About the Author:

Vicky Morgan is an Elementary School Teacher, qualified in Special Education and Autism. Alongside teaching, she tutors and also runs her educational website: www.teachers-of-tomorrow.org, helping new and aspiring teachers along their journey to becoming a teacher and providing resources and services to further their learning.